Dating 1800s house

19-Jan-2015 16:55

Letters written between 16 from the steward to the owner of Levens Hall in Westmorland refer to the use of ‘quarry’ glass (meaning diamond panes) in various buildings around the estate, including the stables and the clock house.The accounts for Levens Hall contain the following item: 'put into severall windos 14 squers of new glass att 2d the squer'.These have a central mullion and a horizontal transom set somewhere above the mid point, and the casement takes up the whole of one of the lower lights.The fixed lights were held in place with wire which attached the leadwork either to vertical stanchions or to horizontal bars known as ‘saddle bars’.Catches took two distinct forms, the spring catch and the turnbuckle.The spring catch seems to have been popular throughout the 17th century.

The catch itself is a horizontal bar which engages a small iron plate set into the window frame; the spring is a second bar which forces the latch into place and holds it shut.

Figure 3 (above) A wrought iron casement with horizontal saddle bars and diamond leaded lights in Cheddington, Bucks.

Note the spiral handle at the base of the casement and the plain hook stay. Figure 4(upper right)Window catches from dated houses (from ‘Fixtures and Fittings in Dated Houses’) Figure 5(lower right) Window catches from 38, Latimer, Bucks illustrating the great variety of window catches found in this house which dates from the second half of the 16th century.

The casements are made of wrought iron and have a variety of ironwork fittings; catches to hold them shut, stays to hold them open, and handles for moving them.

Iron casements continued in use throughout the 18th century and even into the 19th century, often being used for attics and service rooms while the rest of the house was given fashionable sashes.

The catch itself is a horizontal bar which engages a small iron plate set into the window frame; the spring is a second bar which forces the latch into place and holds it shut.

Figure 3 (above) A wrought iron casement with horizontal saddle bars and diamond leaded lights in Cheddington, Bucks.

Note the spiral handle at the base of the casement and the plain hook stay. Figure 4(upper right)Window catches from dated houses (from ‘Fixtures and Fittings in Dated Houses’) Figure 5(lower right) Window catches from 38, Latimer, Bucks illustrating the great variety of window catches found in this house which dates from the second half of the 16th century.

The casements are made of wrought iron and have a variety of ironwork fittings; catches to hold them shut, stays to hold them open, and handles for moving them.

Iron casements continued in use throughout the 18th century and even into the 19th century, often being used for attics and service rooms while the rest of the house was given fashionable sashes.

In probate inventories of the early 17th century the opening casements were regarded as moveable items, to be valued with the other contents.