Dating someone on the job

24-Jul-2016 22:17

Likewise, an innocuous compliment, such as "that's a nice sweater," would not be harassment; but if it were followed up with a sexual reference ("it really shows off your body"), that type of behavior would be inappropriate. This is more akin to nepotism than sexual harassment.

The key is whether the behavior, occurring because of the sex of the employee, creates a hostile or abusive work environment. I've since learned that the promotion went to my supervisor's boyfriend. If the business exists in an environment where sexual favors are required of employees who wish to receive promotions or other favorable treatment from supervisors, however, this could be viewed as sexual harassment. Is this employee's computer screen visible to anyone who passes?

If you have made it clear to your co-worker that you have no further romantic interest in him or her, any ongoing, unwelcome sexual attention that is severe or pervasive could be the basis for a harassment claim.

Q: Is it sexual harassment if I ask a co-worker for a date?

A: Some employers have responded to sexual harassment claims, or the threat of such claims, by enacting policies against dating or intimate relationships between co-workers.

Take it as a sign that you need to be more careful with what you say at work. You should report the problem and give your employer a chance to fix it (for example, making sure you don't have to deal with this customer or discussing the issue of propriety with the customer).

Q: A regular customer of my employer makes offensive sexual remarks every time I see him. It will be considered harassment if your employer knew about it and did nothing to correct the problem. A: The harasser's actions may be a crime, depending on the state in which they occurred.

If you have made it clear to your co-worker that you have no further romantic interest in him or her, any ongoing, unwelcome sexual attention that is severe or pervasive could be the basis for a harassment claim.

Q: Is it sexual harassment if I ask a co-worker for a date?

A: Some employers have responded to sexual harassment claims, or the threat of such claims, by enacting policies against dating or intimate relationships between co-workers.

Take it as a sign that you need to be more careful with what you say at work. You should report the problem and give your employer a chance to fix it (for example, making sure you don't have to deal with this customer or discussing the issue of propriety with the customer).

Q: A regular customer of my employer makes offensive sexual remarks every time I see him. It will be considered harassment if your employer knew about it and did nothing to correct the problem. A: The harasser's actions may be a crime, depending on the state in which they occurred.

If the sexual harassment consisted of a physical attack, criminal sexual conduct, stalking, threats or another crime, the harasser may face criminal penalties.