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28-Apr-2014 02:33

Following the success of this new way to fight anti-social behaviour, companies from Mc Donald's to Co-op, transport authorities and countless shopping malls around the world have employed it.

In the UK, the first to adopt this method to cut crime and disorder was the Tyne and Wear Metro system, in England's North East, in 1997, pumping out Haydn and Mozart at its underground stations to deter vandals and loiterers, after the success achieved by the underground system in Montreal, Canada, in the mid 1990s.

(Let’s forget for a moment the gross inaccuracy of lumping all the music mentioned in this article under one generic term; when I say ‘classicalmusic, we all know what I’m talking about, and all the music here could fit under that monstrous umbrella.) Nothing like a ‘Top Ten Pieces of Classical Music That Must Be Heard Above All Others’ list to get the ball rolling, so let me explain the format: I’ve picked ten pieces, all of which are extremely well-known to classical aficionados, most of which are well-known to the wider world.

I’ll include a brief note on the piece, as well as a recommendation or two of other works or composers that might be appealing if you enjoy that particular work.

This experiment has been tried and has succeeded over many years in several locations.

You're in no danger of switching out Led Zeppelin's box set or The Chronic for Classical Concertos in the Key of C, but if you're thinking it's time to deepen your musical repertoire, we've got the perfect launching point into the greatest hits list of classical music.

This work, composed during the Renaissance, definitely qualifies.

The legend has it that the Catholic Church was considering banning all music that was polyphonic, or exhibiting two or more independent melody lines running simultaneously. Supposedly Palestrina composed this work as a defense of polyphony, and it was heard by the proper authorities, who determined that polyphony could indeed be used in church music, and therefore this one work by Palestrina, dedicated to a pope who reigned for all of three weeks, changed the course of music history.

The Messiah, usually performed around Christmas time, tells the story of the birth, life and death of Jesus. Before you ask me where my pink tutu is, know that this ballet is about ritualistic pagan sacrifices and ends with the slaughtering of a young girl, and was so controversial that it caused a riot when it premiered in 1913.

Yes, this one was also in (the dinosaur thing) but I’m not mining Walt Disney for music; it’s just coincidence, and the fact that this is great music.

You're in no danger of switching out Led Zeppelin's box set or The Chronic for Classical Concertos in the Key of C, but if you're thinking it's time to deepen your musical repertoire, we've got the perfect launching point into the greatest hits list of classical music.This work, composed during the Renaissance, definitely qualifies.The legend has it that the Catholic Church was considering banning all music that was polyphonic, or exhibiting two or more independent melody lines running simultaneously. Supposedly Palestrina composed this work as a defense of polyphony, and it was heard by the proper authorities, who determined that polyphony could indeed be used in church music, and therefore this one work by Palestrina, dedicated to a pope who reigned for all of three weeks, changed the course of music history.The Messiah, usually performed around Christmas time, tells the story of the birth, life and death of Jesus. Before you ask me where my pink tutu is, know that this ballet is about ritualistic pagan sacrifices and ends with the slaughtering of a young girl, and was so controversial that it caused a riot when it premiered in 1913.Yes, this one was also in (the dinosaur thing) but I’m not mining Walt Disney for music; it’s just coincidence, and the fact that this is great music.Dark, furious, intense, melancholy, brooding—officially this work was composed as a memorial for the victims of fascism, but Shostakovich may have really intended a broader message, that of repudiation of totalitarianism in general (which would of course include the Soviet government…) (the ‘American’) by Antonin Dvorak.