Patty griffen dating

11-Mar-2015 06:05

I used all my paint.” And over the course of the tour, the two became a couple., a World War II veteran, high school science teacher, and father of seven.Griffin describes him as a “rough-and-tumble” Boston Irish Catholic, although he also spent time in a Trappist monastery in Virginia.“I’m not going to lie, Robert was one of my vocal inspirations early on.I got to sing in so many styles singing with him [on tour].She is known for her stripped-down songwriting style in the folk music genre.Her songs have been covered by numerous musicians, including Emmylou Harris, Ellis Paul, Rory Block, Dave Hause, and the Dixie Chicks.

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It was historic, because any way you slice it, Plant is the biggest rock star ever to live within Austin’s city limits. Since Plant moved here, in 2011, to live with Griffin, there’s been no shortage of people trying to guess the precise location of their South Austin home, of I-saw-him-at-the-H-E-B Facebook posts, of passersby scrutinizing Griffin’s left hand, attempting to figure out whether they’re married (they’re not).

She’d effectively be a backup singer, but she says that was okay because it would give her more time to grieve and let her do the kind of singing she grew up on, singing that could help her shed the folksinger tag she had so often been saddled with.

She would get to rock.“What inspired me to sing in the first place was rock stuff, showy stuff,” she says.

“I guess when I’m done with this I want to have some music that people keep in their lives for years to come,” she says. You hope to have done some work that’s strong enough to connect with people after you’re gone.

I just listened to Bo Diddley last night while I was washing my floors, and man, he’s hilarious.

It was historic, because any way you slice it, Plant is the biggest rock star ever to live within Austin’s city limits. Since Plant moved here, in 2011, to live with Griffin, there’s been no shortage of people trying to guess the precise location of their South Austin home, of I-saw-him-at-the-H-E-B Facebook posts, of passersby scrutinizing Griffin’s left hand, attempting to figure out whether they’re married (they’re not).

She’d effectively be a backup singer, but she says that was okay because it would give her more time to grieve and let her do the kind of singing she grew up on, singing that could help her shed the folksinger tag she had so often been saddled with.

She would get to rock.“What inspired me to sing in the first place was rock stuff, showy stuff,” she says.

“I guess when I’m done with this I want to have some music that people keep in their lives for years to come,” she says. You hope to have done some work that’s strong enough to connect with people after you’re gone.

I just listened to Bo Diddley last night while I was washing my floors, and man, he’s hilarious.

“And it made me notice things, watching him pass away, about how, from the time he was born to the time he died, America became an absolutely unrecognizable place.”is the antiwar anthem “Not a Bad Man,” which was inspired by her father’s postwar experience and that of a young soldier she says she heard about in an Austin TV news report who signed up for service after 9/11, returned from the war with mental health issues, and ended his life.