Porcelain dating

12-Jul-2015 06:35

After his death that October, Johann Friedrich Böttger continued von Tschirnhaus's work and brought porcelain to the market.

The production of porcelain at Meissen, near Dresden, started in 1710 and attracted artists and artisans to establish one of the most famous porcelain manufacturers, still in business today as Staatliche Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen Gmb H.

Its signature logo, the crossed swords, was introduced in 1720 to protect its production; the mark of the crossed swords is one of the oldest trademarks in existence.

It dominated the style of European porcelain until 1756.

At the beginning of the eighteenth century Johann Friedrich Böttger pretended he had solved the dream of the alchemists, to produce gold from worthless materials.

When King Augustus II of Poland heard of it, he kept him in protective custody and requested him to produce gold.

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The next sculptor, Johann Jakob Kirchner, was the first to make large-scale statues and figurines, especially of Baroque saints.

For years Johann Friedrich Böttger was unsuccessful in this effort.

At the same time, Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus, a mathematician and scientist, experimented with the manufacture of glass, trying to make porcelain as well.

In order to identify the original Meissen products, Meissen developed markings that initially were painted on, but were soon fired in underglaze blue. 1719 by Antoine Watteau (1684-1721), now in the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Early markings such as AR (Augustus Rex, the monogram of the King), K. Augustus II charged first Johann Jakob Irminger with the design of new vessels.

The next sculptor, Johann Jakob Kirchner, was the first to make large-scale statues and figurines, especially of Baroque saints.

For years Johann Friedrich Böttger was unsuccessful in this effort.

At the same time, Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus, a mathematician and scientist, experimented with the manufacture of glass, trying to make porcelain as well.

In order to identify the original Meissen products, Meissen developed markings that initially were painted on, but were soon fired in underglaze blue. 1719 by Antoine Watteau (1684-1721), now in the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Early markings such as AR (Augustus Rex, the monogram of the King), K. Augustus II charged first Johann Jakob Irminger with the design of new vessels.

As a further precaution, very few workers knew the special secret (arcanum) of how to make porcelain, and then perhaps only part of the process. Variations in the logo allow approximate dating of the wares.