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16-Apr-2014 11:54

They appear to the application as a normal X server, but they perform X11 rendering to a virtual framebuffer in main memory rather than to a real framebuffer on a graphics card.

This allows the X proxy to send only images to the client machine rather than chatty X-Windows rendering commands.

For the most part, VGL does not interfere with the delivery of Open GL commands to the graphics card, either (there are some exceptions, such as its handling of color index rendering.) VGL merely forces the Open GL commands to be delivered to a server-side graphics card rather than a client-side graphics card.

Once the Open GL rendering context has been established in a server-side Pbuffer, everything (including esoteric Open GL extensions, fragment/vertex programs, etc.) should “just work.” In most cases, if an application runs locally on a 3D server/workstation, that same application will run remotely from that same machine using Virtual GL.

Virtual GL thus “virtualizes” 3D graphics hardware, allowing it to be co-located in the “cold room” with compute and storage resources.

Virtual GL also allows 3D graphics hardware to be shared among multiple users, and it provides “workstation-like” levels of performance on even the most modest of networks.

The beauty of this approach is its non-intrusiveness.

Normally, a Unix Open GL application would send all of its drawing commands and data, both 2D and 3D, to an X-Windows server, which may be located across the network from the application server.

However, if it were really as simple as that, we could all turn out the lights and go home.

Most of the time spent developing Virtual GL has been spent working around “stupid application tricks.” Virtual GL can currently use one of three “image transports” to send rendered 3D images to the client machine: The VGL Image Transport is most often used whenever the 2D X server (the X server used to draw the application’s GUI and transmit keyboard and mouse events back to the application server) is located across the network from the application server, for instance if the 2D X server is running on the user’s desktop machine.

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Normally, a Unix Open GL application would send all of its drawing commands and data, both 2D and 3D, to an X-Windows server, which may be located across the network from the application server.However, if it were really as simple as that, we could all turn out the lights and go home.Most of the time spent developing Virtual GL has been spent working around “stupid application tricks.” Virtual GL can currently use one of three “image transports” to send rendered 3D images to the client machine: The VGL Image Transport is most often used whenever the 2D X server (the X server used to draw the application’s GUI and transmit keyboard and mouse events back to the application server) is located across the network from the application server, for instance if the 2D X server is running on the user’s desktop machine.Nucor Building Systems has been a leader in the design and manufacture of custom-engineered metal building systems for more than two and a half decades.With a focus on customer service, price, and quality – Nucor Building Systems has four locations and a network of over 1,200 Authorized Builders serving all of North America.Virtual GL, however, employs a technique called “split rendering” to force the 3D commands from the application to go to a 3D graphics card in the application server.